Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth With Bill

Part 1

Season 1, Episode 1 of 1

Campbell discusses how the concept of the hero has infiltrated all cultures around the world, and has been a consistent cultural theme for centuries. He goes on to illuminate how all the hero stories are tied together, and reflect the same underlying structure. Campbell uses a number of diverse examples, starting with Moses and the exodus before moving on to Native American mythology and even today's Star Wars films. He challenges everyone to see the presence of a heroic journey in his or her life. The Message of the Myth - 102 - Campbell compares creation myths from around the world, pointing out the unifying themes and symbols. Moyers and Campbell examine the myriad number of ways in which the power of mythology transcends religion and takes us to the center of our being. Campbell brings to light the similarities in most creation stories, and notes that most religions simply bring out new ways to cloak the old myths. As the hour closes, he expounds on these myths, urging viewers to have the experience of bliss - "here and now." The First Storytellers - 103 - In this episode, Moyers and Campbell examine the creation of ritual behavior and the need of humans to propagate the recorded story, whether it is orally, through artwork, or elsewhere. Campbell also discusses the rebirth of life through the rituals of the early humans and their connection with nature. As the episode closes, he paints a picture of a central mountain inside each one of us that connects us to our creator, bringing us into the concept of eternity while here on Earth.

Previously Aired

Day
Time
Channel
3/4/2012
8 a.m.
3/4/2012
11:30 p.m.
3/15/2012
9 p.m.
3/18/2012
8 a.m.
9/8/2012
10 a.m.
9/9/2012
1 a.m.
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