Waila! Making the People Happy

Episode 1 of 1

Waila music comes from the Tohono O'odham, the native people of the Sonoran desert and the largest Indian tribe of southern Arizona. Waila (pronounced why-la) is an O'odham word that comes from the Spanish word "baile," which means "to dance." There are no words to waila music -- it is only instrumental, and is played on a button accordion, alto saxophone, electric six-string and bass guitars, and drums. Waila began from the music of early fiddle bands that adapted European and Mexican tunes heard in northern Sonora. The dances performed in the waila tradition are the waila (which is similar to a polka), the chote (based on a folk dance from Scotland or Germany), and the mazurka (based on a Polish folk dance). Regardless of the beat, all waila dances are performed while moving around the floor in a counterclockwise direction.

Previously Aired

Day
Time
Channel
5/4/2009
10:30 p.m.
5/5/2009
3:30 a.m.
11/22/2009
6:30 p.m.
11/25/2009
2:30 p.m.
4/10/2011
6:30 p.m.
3/19/2013
8:30 p.m.
3/20/2013
2:30 a.m.
3/24/2013
2:30 p.m.
3/25/2013
1:30 a.m.
3/26/2013
2:30 p.m.
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